Buffy was a feminist challenge to gender hierarch: Sarah Michelle Gellar

Sarah-Michelle-Geller

It’s been 20 whole years since Buffy The Vampire Slayer premiered on TV. If that doesn’t make you feel old, then God knows what will. Either way, the cast of the cult series has been celebrating its 20th anniversary, reports NME.

Buffy ran for seven seasons from 1997 to 2003. Its lead star Sarah Michelle Gellar took to Instagram to write that appearing in the show had been “the greatest privilege.”

“While we knew the potential, I don’t think any of us saw the lasting impact our show would have. As an actor, you wish for that one role where you can leave your mark and forever be remembered. With Buffy I got so much more,” said Sarah. “She’s a feminist challenge to gender hierarchy. Buffy may have been the Chosen One, but I was the lucky one.”

The actress went on to thank the creators, crew and her co-stars. “And lastly, but most importantly thank you to all of you, the fans. We made this show for you, and your unwavering support has kept this show going long past our seven years. You are everything.”

Meanwhile, Anthony Stewart Head – who portrayed Giles – has penned an article for The Guardian in which he calls the show “a feminist parable for everyone,” including himself. “Twenty years after we started, I see that our series gave flesh (and horns) to the demons we all face in life: teenage Buffy’s storylines transcended age or gender,” he wrote.

David Boreanaz, who played Angel, also told EW, “I was in the right spot at the right time, but I had been struggling for years just to get in the door. I couldn’t even do a commercial, like a gum commercial without freaking out. You have to go through the pain to get to the other end, and then once you get to the top, you’re not down — you gotta climb other mountains.”